Browse All : Globe by Joslin, Gilman

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Joslin, Gilman, Loring, Josiah
Loring's Terrestrial Globe.
1859
Globe
Authors Joslin, Gilman, Loring, Josiah
Full Title Loring's Terrestrial Globe containing all the Late Discoveries and Geographical Improvements, also the Tracks of the most celebrated Circumnavigators. Compiled from Smith's new English globe, with additions and improvements by Annin & Smith. Revised by G.W. Boynton. Manufactured by Gilman & Joslin, Boston. 1859.
Note This is a very late issue of the Loring/Joslin terrestrial globe, revised by Boynton. Later issues of this globe by Joslin (in the 1870's) drop the Loring name. This is a 12 inch desk globe with a four legged stand and horizon ring, total height from base to top 18 inches.
Joslin, Gilman, Loring, Josiah
Loring's Terrestrial Globe.
1854
Globe
Authors Joslin, Gilman, Loring, Josiah
Full Title Loring's Terrestrial Globe containing all the Late Discoveries and Geographical Improvements, also the Tracks of the most celebrated Navigators. Compiled from Smith's new English globe with additions and improvements by Annin & Smith. Revised by Roswell Park. Manufactured by Gilman Joslin, Boston. 1854.
Note This is a floor standing 12-inch globe with a cast iron columnar base with three feet, total height 41 inches. It is paired with the Celestial globe of the same date.
Joslin, Gilman, Loring, Josiah
Loring's Celestial Globe.
1854
Globe
Authors Joslin, Gilman, Loring, Josiah
Full Title Loring's Celestial Globe Containing all the known Stars Nebulae &c. Compiled from the works of Wollaston, Flamsted, de la Caille, Havelius, Mayer, Bradley, Herschel, Maskelyne. The Transactions of the Astronomical Society of London &c, &c. (From Smith's New English Globe). Boston: Josiah Loring, 136 Washington St. 1854.
Note This is a 12-inch floor stand globe paired with the 1854 Terrestrial floor globe by Loring/Joslin. Although Joslin is not listed as publisher on the Celestial globe, I assume he issued it under Loring's imprint. Total height is 41 inches.
Copley, Charles, Joslin, Gilman
Improved Globe, Boston. (Terrestrial Globe).
1869
Globe
Authors Copley, Charles, Joslin, Gilman
Full Title Improved Globe, Boston. Manufactured by Gilman Joslin, Corrected to 1870. Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1852 by Charles Copley ... New York. (Terrestrial Globe).
Note 16" pair of Terrestrial and Celestial globes. These globes were originally issued by Copley and sold by Blunt in New York in 1852. Joslin revised and reissued them (this pair) in 1869, continuing until the 1890's (Warner). These are both floor stand models and are illustrated in Joslin's catalogue of the early 1870's (see our copy). Franklin Globes also issued the Copley Globes, but they may have been made by Joslin or Nims for Franklin (Warner). "National Park" is shown in the U.S. where Yellowstone Park was created in 1872, but we think this is anticipatory rather than after the fact. The "corrected to 1870" was usually done a year or two before the date (Coffeen). The Copley globes are beautifully executed, have a "modern" look, and are "extremely detailed, even to the point of obscurity" (Warner). Warner further states that "no examples of the Joslin 1869 state of these globes are known." This pair may be the only survivors. Copley won a gold medal in 1852 from the American Institute for the globes (see Transactions of the American Institute 1852, p124-5). Warner lists a Franklin 16" Terrestrial (3-88) by Nims that is similar to this. Total height from base to top is 43 inches.
Copley, Charles, Joslin, Gilman
Improved Globe, Boston. (Celestial Globe).
1869
Globe
Authors Copley, Charles, Joslin, Gilman
Full Title Improved Globe, Boston. Manufactured by Gilman Joslin, Corrected to 1870. Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1852 by Charles Copley ... New York. (Celestial Globe).
Note 16" pair of Terrestrial and Celestial globes. These globes were originally issued by Copley and sold by Blunt in New York in 1852. Joslin revised and reissued them (this pair) in 1869, continuing until the 1890's (Warner). These are both floor stand models and are illustrated in Joslin's catalogue of the early 1870's (see our copy). Franklin Globes also issued the Copley Globes, but they may have been made by Joslin or Nims for Franklin (Warner). "National Park" is shown in the U.S. where Yellowstone Park was created in 1872, but we think this is anticipatory rather than after the fact. The "corrected to 1870" was usually done a year or two before the date (Coffeen). The Copley globes are beautifully executed, have a "modern" look, and are "extremely detailed, even to the point of obscurity" (Warner). Warner further states that "no examples of the Joslin 1869 state of these globes are known." This pair may be the only survivors. Copley won a gold medal in 1852 from the American Institute for the globes (see Transactions of the American Institute 1852, p124-5). Warner lists a Franklin 16" Terrestrial (3-88) by Nims that is similar to this. Total height from base to top is 43 inches.
Joslin, Gilman
(New Solar Telluric Globe).
1854
Globe
Authors Joslin, Gilman
Full Title (New Solar Telluric Globe). (with) Joslin's Six Inch Terrestrial Globe, Containing the Latest Discoveries...1854. Drawn and Engraved by W.B. Annin.
Note This is Joslin's six inch globe on a special mount which demonstrates the relative motions of the earth and sun. In 1853 this device won a bronze medal at the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association fair which stated that it was "very simple in construction, and highly useful for illustrating Geography and Astronomy in schools." This copy lacks the metal ring around the globe which is illustrated in Joslin's catalog - it is possible that it was issued without it in some copies. Most of the horizon ring calendar is worn off. Height from base of stand to top of globe is 9 inches.
Joslin, Gilman
Joslin's Six Inch Terrestrial Globe.
1860
Globe
Authors Joslin, Gilman
Full Title Joslin's Six Inch Terrestrial Globe, Containing the Latest Discoveries. Boston. Gilman Joslin. 1860. Drawn and Engraved by W.B. Annin.
Note Drawn and engraved by W.B. Annin. Very detailed physical features. Annin's name on a globe of this late date is puzzling, since he was active in the period 1815-40, as a maker of globes and (with Smith) as engraver for Cumming's School Geography and Daniel Adam's School Geography (see Ristow p.294, Tooley Dictionary). With a lovely floral iron stand. Total height of the globe and stand is 9.5 inches.
Joslin, Gilman
Joslin's Six Inch Terrestrial Globe.
1846
Globe
Authors Joslin, Gilman
Full Title Joslin's Six Inch Terrestrial Globe, Containing the Latest Discoveries. Boston. Gilman Joslin. 1846. Drawn and Engraved by W.B. Annin.
Note Joslin's first globe was a six inch model issued in 1839. This 1846 issue is probably the second edition (Yonge lists only the 1839 and this 1846, none in between). In color, with a three legged stand, horizon ring and brass meridian. Globe from bottom of the base to the top of the meridian is 10 inches.
Joslin, Gilman
Joslin's Six Inch Terrestrial Globe.
1851
Globe
Authors Joslin, Gilman
Full Title Joslin's Six Inch Terrestrial Globe, Containing the Latest Discoveries. Boston. Gilman Joslin. 1851. Drawn and Engraved by W.B. Annin.
Note Changes from the 1846 issue include showing California, Utah and New Mexico as part of the United States (only by color, the engraving unchanged). Total height including the base and the meridian is 10 inches.
Joslin, Gilman
Joslin's Six Inch Terrestrial Globe.
1870
Globe
Authors Joslin, Gilman
Full Title Joslin's Six Inch Terrestrial Globe, Containing the Latest Discoveries. Boston. Gilman Joslin. Drawn and Engraved by W.B. Annin.
Note The full color 6 inch globe is undated - the date is estimated from the presence of Alaska (1867). Oregon Territory is not shown (it is shown on the 1860 issue), and New Holland is removed from Australia. On a single turned wooden base with a total height of 11 inches. Very late issue of this globe.
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