Browse All : Images by Wilson, James

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Lancaster, Cyrus, Wilson, Ja …
Wilson's New American Thirte …
1836
Globe
Authors Lancaster, Cyrus, Wilson, James
Full Title Wilson's New American Thirteen Inch Terrestrial Globe, Exhibiting with the Greatest Possible Accuracy, The Positions of the Principal Known Places of the Earth, with the Tracks of Various Circumnavigators, Together with New Discoveries and Political Alterations Down to the present Period: 1836. By Cyrus Lancaster, Albany St. N.Y. S. Wood & Sons Agents N. York.
Note The second year of production of Wilson's Thirteen Inch Globe by Cyrus Lancaster. Compared to the last Wilson issue of 1834 (see our #4310) we cannot detect any changes in the geography. In fact, both the 1834 and the 1836 are out of date regarding the United States - Arkansas is shown in enlarged pre 1824 form and Northwestern Territory is shown where Michigan Territory should be. But then most of the early American globes did not keep current with the changes to political geography. With a four leg table stand. Total height from base to top is 18 inches.
Lancaster, Cyrus, Wilson, Ja …
Wilson's New American Thirte …
1850
Globe
Authors Lancaster, Cyrus, Wilson, James
Full Title Wilson's New American Thirteen Inch Terrestrial Globe, Exhibiting with the Greatest Possible Accuracy, The Positions of the Principal Known Places of the Earth, with the Tracks of Various Circumnavigators, Together with New Discoveries and Political Alterations Down to the present Period 1850. By Cyrus Lancaster, Albany, N.Y.
Note Wilson began making thirteen inch globes in 1821 (see Yonge p.69) and in 1835 Cyrus Lancaster (having assumed leadership of the firm after the death of Wilson's two sons in 1833) brought out a new edition of the thirteen inch globe with the American eagle in the cartouche (Dekker/van der Krogt p. 132). This 1850 edition of the terrestrial globe is not recorded in any of the listings - only an 1850 celestial globe is listed by Kimball. Therefore it is the latest known example of Wilson's terrestrial globe. The plates are clearly tired, the image of the cartouche is weak and some of the mountain ranges are barely visible. But there is much new engraving in North America, showing the new divisions in the west - California, Oregon, Utah, New Mexico, and the new cities - Mormon City, Sacramento, Stockton, Albuquerque, etc. It has been suggested that this is the first showing of Mormon City on a globe. With a four legged table stand and horizon ring, total height from base to top is 18 inches.
Wilson, James
Terrestrial Globe ... Celest …
1822
Globe
Authors Wilson, James
Full Title A three inch Terrestrial Globe by Wilson's & Co. Alby. (with) A Celestial Globe, With all the Stars of the 1st. 2d. & 3d. Magnitudes. By Wilson & Son's Alby.
Note The date of the globes is an estimate. Paired with a three inch celestial globe. On a turned wooden stand with four black ball feet, full height from base to top, 5 inches. Warner says that Wilson changed the business name from Wilson & Co. to Wilson & Sons in 1822. The celestial globe this is paired with is by Wilson & Sons, so I assume 1822 as the only year globes were made with both business names. The globe is very well engraved, showing much detail in the continents for its small size. Longitude is given from both Washington and London. Kimball notes that David Wilson, James' son, did the engraving for a new edition of the three inch globes in the early 1820's, which I assume are these globes. David later had brief success as a miniature painter, utilizing the same delicate engraving skills which he applied to these extremely well engraved globes. The three inch globe was also sold in pocket form with the celestial sphere on the inside of the case and on a stand with horizon ring and brass meridian. On this turned wooden stand version, the globe is mounted horizontally, an unusual presentation. Wilson made the first globes in the United States, with 1810 his first year of production and 1850 (by Cyrus Lancaster) his last.
Wilson, James
New American Celestial Globe …
1826
Globe
Authors Wilson, James
Full Title A New American Celestial Globe Containing the positions of nearly 5000 Stars, Clusters, Nebulae &c. Carefully compil'd & laid down from the latest & most approv'd astronomical tables reduced to the present time. By J. Wilson & Sons. 1826. Albany, St. N.Y.
Note The first edition of Wilson's revised Celestial Globe, after his edition of 1812 which was reissued to 1825. On a four leg table stand. Height of the globe is 13 inches, from base to top is 18 inches.
Wilson, James
New American Thirteen Inch T …
1834
Globe
Authors Wilson, James
Full Title A New American Thirteen Inch Terrestrial Globe, Exhibiting with the Greatest Possible Accuracy, The Positions of the Principal Known Places of the Earth, with the Tracks of Various Circumnavigators, Together with New Discoveries and Political Alterations Down to the present Period: 1834. By J. Wilson & Sons, Albany St. N.Y. S. Wood & Sons Agents N. York.
Note The last year this globe was produced by Wilson & Sons. Both of Wilson's sons died in 1833, and this event necessitated a change in the company's management. In 1835 Cyrus Lancaster took over the business and signed his name to all the globes produced after that date. Four legged desk stand. Height from base to top is 18 inches.
Wilson, James
A New American Terrestrial G …
1811
Globe
Authors Wilson, James
Full Title A New American Terrestrial Globe on which the Principal Places of the Known World are Accurately laid down with the traced attempts of Captain Cook to discover a Southern Continent by James Wilson 1811.
Note Wilson's first dated globe, issued one year after his undated 1810 globe, also 13 inches. This is the first dated globe issued in the United States. In 1812 Wilson issued his first Celestial Globe. This thirteen inch Terrestrial Globe is on a four leg table stand. Total height from base to tip is 18 inches.
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